Hike Tasmania Over the Weekend

Hike Tasmania Over the Weekend

Tasmania, an island and southernmost state of Australia, has almost 60% of its land protected within national parks and reserves and 20% of this is under World Heritage-listed. It is also renowned for the freshest air on the planet. There are 19 national parks across the island with walking trails to suit every level of hikers. They can be long or short, gentle or challenging, from mountains to coast, urban parks walks to remote wilderness. There are many wonderful Tasmanian walks to indulge in starting with several hours to a day or multi days and weeks.
 
 
The hike to Three Capes hugging the coast of the Tasman Peninsula offers multi days hike of 3 days or 4 days with different routes catering to different grades of hikers. A 3-day easy grade hike was picked and it is a hugely popular itinerary that can be easily fulfilled over a long weekend.
 
The guided trip begins in downtown Hobart and you’ll be whisked off on a boat to the starting point of the hike. Walks will bring hikers to Cape Raoul on the Three Capes Track and explore hidden pockets of wilderness on the trails of the Tasman Peninsula. 2 nights will be spent in a secluded camp site where you will wake up to ocean views stretching out to Tasman Island from your bed.
 
After assembling at the base in downtown Hobart, we followed our guide to Brooke Street Pier to board our private boat down to Nubeena to start the hike. During the 90-minute cruise, marvel at spectacular coastal sites and views where the boat skipper shared some cracking stories enroute.
 
If the weather is no good, the transfer to Nubeena will be by car or mini coach.
 
 
 
Today’s hike will cover around 3 to 4 hours of walking and only a day pack is required to carry own’s essential items, water and packed lunch. There are no shelter along the way so UV protection is highly advised. Umbrellas are of not much use due to strong winds most of the time.
 
The walk started to see the Remarkable Cave. As its name suggest, this is a truly remarkable place. As we took the steps boardwalks down, see ancient sandstone tunnel carved by the sea.
 

 
 
 
 
Then walk along hard gravel path as the cliffs along the Tasman Peninsula becomes staple views. A hike up to Mount Brown is optional and it can be easily achieved within 30 minutes with ascents and descents.  The climb to the summit is well worth every step. On a clear day, you can see sweeping panoramas of Cape Raoul, Cape Pillar and Tasman Island.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
From here we walked down to Crescent Bay and through some sand dunes before covering the last stretch along the beach. Therefore join up with a private track and the very comfortable Tasman Camp unfolded in front of our eyes.
 
 
 
 
We were thoroughly impressed with the facilities of the campsite. The tents are of glamping standard with very comfortable double bed within. Each tent is designed with ocean facing and you can literally hear waves clashing on the cliffs while putting you to sleep. There’s no electricity available at the tents and each tent is equipped with a chargeable lamp. The only place with electricity access is the main lodge where we can relax by the fire place and enjoy our meals.
 
 
 
 
view from the lodge
 
The shared bathrooms are clean with warm showers available and quality essential toiletries are provided. Our guide quickly turned host and chef while we went about relaxing around the campsite. Our guide-turned-chef and an assistant quickly prepared dinner.
 
 
 
 
Before we returned back to our tents to retire for the night, we were reminded to look up into the black sky full of dazzling stars shimmering like diamonds and watch the lovely sunrise the next day – while lying on the bed.

 
The next day after breakfast, we set off the highlight hike of the day to Cape Raoul. It is going to be a full day of hiking spending around 5 to 6 hours outdoor. The walk begins with shoes brush at the beginning of the trail to prevent transport foreign living organisms into the National Park. The it is a gentle climb through eucalyputus forest before the grand Tasman Sea begins to reveal itself as with each step forward.
 
 
 
 
 
Due to time constraint on our hike, we could only reach the lookout points and imagined the walking route through the forest and eventually until a descent to Cape Raoul Lookout. As our guide explained, it feels like the edge of the world when there! You may hear the seals way down below!
 
Thereafter, the return walk slight differs and is equally special with its varied perspective.
 
 
On the last day of the hiking weekend vacation, you walk at Tasman Arch, gentle ascent along coastal paths with rock formations and stunning views out to the ocean. Around 2 KM, you will get to the Waterfall Bay and see a waterfall cascading over the seacliffs into the ocean. If the group walks fast, there is an option to continue to Waterfall Bluff (extra 4 KM more).
 
Enroute on the land journey back to Hobart, a celebration lunch with wine tasting will be held at a well-known vineyard.
 
 
 
 
If you are planning a trip to Tasmania and would like to take a couple of days for some hiking, this itinerary is suitable for beginner’s hikers. The best time for hikes in Tasmania (to suit tropical hikers like us) is from October to March.
 
Get in touch with us.
 
We are available for a chat on: Line, KakaoTalk, Telegram, WeChat, WhatsApp & Viber @ +65 8714 3321. Email: TWSG@travel-wander.com.
 
 
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Posted on 18 Feb 2024 0 103
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